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How to Pick the Right Wine Glass

 

Sparkling, full-bodied, light, white, red, rosé… there’s a glass for every wine! But what exactly should you look for in a wine glass? Here are a few things to keep in mind.

 

The price

What makes a $20 wine glass so different than a $5 one? The answer is simple. Just like for wine, it’s all about the provenance and what goes into making the wine glass. French wine glasses are renowned for being some of the best in the world but can be quite expensive.

For the best quality at an affordable price, you may be surprised to know that you should look to the Czech Republic. In fact, their glass industry has become famous for its bohemian crystal, a sure sign of quality.

 

Materials and durability

The materials used to make a wine glass obviously have a huge impact on its quality. For a long time, crystal was the most common material used but it also contained lead to make the glass clearer and sparkle brightly. Over time, lead has been replaced by other components such as titanium which can make the glass more resistant, even dishwasher safe. But beware, it can still break!

 

Choosing a type of wine glass

There are five main types of wine glass:

1. The flute. If you’re thinking about popping open a bottle of bubbly, the flute is your go-to glass. If you love the aroma of a sparkling wine, you can also serve it in a white wine glass which will maximize its bouquet.

2. The all-purpose white wine glass. If you enjoy a fruity white wine (like a sauvignon blanc) or a grenache rosé which is dry yet sweet, serve it chilled in an all-purpose white wine glass.

3. The balloon wine glass. Also known as a Burgundy wine glass, it has been designed with a wide bowl bottom to help you enjoy a light Pinot Noir or an Oaked Chardonnay. Its large bowl is perfect for swirling the wine which helps it aerate and release its aromas. The glass tapers at the top to a narrow rim, which helps intensify the wine’s smell.

4. The large wine glass. Large, tall wine glasses are used for wines rich in tannin such as a Cabernet Sauvignon. They are also perfect for robust, aromatic Bordeaux wines. In fact, the more fleshy a wine, the more it will benefit from being aerated within the glass itself.

5. The stemless wine glass. If you’re planning a picnic, a stroll through the vineyards, or even a party, you might want to go with stemless wine glasses which are easier to handle and built to be sturdier.

 

Other parts of the wine glass

In addition to the price, durability, and type, there are a few other details that can make a big difference in the quality of a wine glass. First, the rim must be thin and not hinder the pleasure of tasting the wine. A thick rim is a giveaway that the glass wasn’t made with much precision.

The bowl should be thin but sturdy. In general, a large, flared glass will help the wine aerate much better.

The stem may be strengthened at the base of the bowl but it’s important to be careful when drying a wine glass because it often breaks at that point. Stay away from glasses that seem to have a fragile bowl-stem joint. Finally, the foot must provide maximum stability for the wine glass.

In closing, a wine glass is a simple way to elevate your wine tasting experience! High-quality glasses will not only enhance your décor, but also your wines.

I’m proud to offer this new line of wine glasses made in the famous Bohemia region of the Czech Republic. This is a dream come true for me and I hope they’ll be a beautiful addition to your wine glass collection. Thank you to Metro My Grocer!

 

Wine Pairings

White Wine Pairings (French Only)

Red Wine Pairings (French Only)

Jessica HarnoisJessica HarnoisJessica Harnois

 

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